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 Homebrew Rulings

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Better Alex



Posts : 148
Join date : 2011-09-30

PostSubject: Homebrew Rulings   Mon Jul 02, 2012 8:47 pm

New Skills and New Skill Uses

Balance
Resist Zero-G Bull Rush: Under zero gravity conditions, the Balance skill may be used to resist the increased effect of a Bull Rush attempt. Normally, a successful Bull Rush attempt in zero gravity conditions results in the character being moved 2 squares, as opposed to 1 square for every 5 points by which the attacker's Strength check exceeds the defender's. However, the defender may make a Balance check (opposed by the attacker’s own Balance skill or Dexterity check) in order to reduce the Bull Rush movement to 5 feet per 5 points of success on the Strength check, as per a normal Bull Rush in standard gravity. This check is made as a free action, in reaction to the attacker’s Bull Rush attempt.

Climb

Rappelling: This use of the Climb skill may not be used untrained. A character can make a Climb check to rappel down a rope rather than climbing down it. Rappelling allows a character to descend much more quickly, moving a number of feet down a rope within a single round. The DC of a rappelling check depends on the character’s movement and the amount of distance he wishes to descend.
The maximum distance that can be moved is four times the character’s Move or the length of rope he is rappelling from, whichever is less. While a character is rappelling he can take no actions and is considered flat-footed. The round after a character lands he must spend the entire round clearing himself from the rope and gear (gloves, hooks to the rope, possibly a harness), may not move from the square where he ended his rappelling movement and is considered flat-footed until the beginning of his next action.
A failed Climb check for rappelling means that the character moves only half the distance he intended to. A check failed by 5 or more means the character falls the distance he intended to rappel.

Distance RappelledDC
Less than character's movement speed10
1-2 times character's movement speed15
3 times character's movement speed20
4 times character's movement speed30
Rappelling without something brace against+5

Computer Use

Hacking: In addition to the standard hacking actions, a character may perform the following:
ActionComputer Use DCTime
Disabling a Passive VI-controlled object (e.g., a security camera, laser tripwire)15Standard action
Disabling an Active VI-controlled object (e.g., a machine-gun turret, missile launcher, flamethrower)20Standard action
Disabling an energy shield projector10 + shield ratingFull round action
Hacking into a robot AIAI's Computer Use check1 round per DC 5
Overloading a powered suit's motors (wearer reduced to half speed, -2 to attacks and saving throws)Suit's opposed Computer Use check (1d20+suit's equipment bonus)Full-round action

Send Transmission
: This skill represents familiarity with communication systems, from backpack sized satellite radios to the satellites themselves. Unless there is severe weather, the character’s transmitter is damaged, or an enemy is actively jamming his signal, there is usually no need to make a check. If the character’s transmitter is damaged, then the DC of her skill check is 10 + the amount of damage the system has suffered. If there is a storm, the DC would be anywhere from 15 for an extremely heavy thunderstorm to 30 during hurricane conditions. If the character is attempting to overcome enemy Electronic Warfare, then the DC is usually as per a skill contest. If the character rolls the DC needed exactly, then a partial, garbled message gets through.

Jamming: Most of the time, this skill is not rolled against a static DC, but rather rolled as a skill contest against the Computer Use of the character’s opponent. The character engaging in active jamming rolls his or her skill check first, which sets the DC for her opponent’s Computer Use skill to successfully get a signal through.

Transmission Interception: If a signal is not scrambled (meaning it is a general broadcast on an unsecured frequency) then intercepting it requires a Computer Use check (DC 10). If the signal is scrambled (see below) it requires a successful skill vs. skill contest against your opponents Computer Use roll.

Transmission Triangulation: Once a transmission has been intercepted, a character with this skill may make another skill check (DC 5 higher than the check required to intercept a signal) to determine where that signal was broadcast. This grants a +5 bonus to any active sensor scan to detect the target.

Scramble/Unscramble Transmission: Computer Use can be used to scramble a transmission. This is done with an opposed Computer Use check between the individual sending the message and anyone attempting to intercept or unscramble it.

Electronic Counter Measures: Electronic Warfare is an extremely powerful defence against missile attacks against aircraft. A character with the Electronic Warfare feat may roll a skill check and use that result as the Defence of any craft he or she is flying. The missile must then hit the craft’s Defence or the result of the skill check, whichever is higher. This use of the Computer Use skill may not be performed without the Electronic Warfare feat.

Mindhacking
The development of neural computer and networking links enabled the unprecedented capability of individuals to access internet networks hands-free and on-the-go. However, it also opened up the possibility of others accessing one's mind using the same technology; if a brain is able to wirelessly access the internet and stream data to-and-fro, very little stands in the way of another person tapping into that data stream or even following it to the source. This is called "mindhacking" and it is a Class B Felony offence.
If a character possesses a Communication Weave cybernetic implant or possesses a computer with a wireless link, he or she can attempt to log into the mind of another person who has a Communication Weave. The character and his or her target make opposed Computer Use checks, with the target adding his or her base Will save modifier to the check; if the hacking character succeeds, he or she may access the data stream of their target's cybernetic brain. The hacking character may implant viruses, alter perception, download or upload data, and other activities just as one would do so while using a normal neural-linked computer.

Craft (Biological)
This skill covers the use of genetic engineering, growth cultures, and other methods to craft biological products from scratch. This includes the manufacture of wetware, gene modifications and templates, and cloning as well as more simple things such as growing bacterial cultures and breeding viruses.

Weaponized Diseases: The first step in the creation of a biological weapon, a "weaponized" disease is one that has been bred to be especially virulent. Information on weaponizing virulent diseases is highly restricted, and seeking this information, or someone who has it, will likely trigger an investigation by the authorities. Weaponizing a virus increases the Saving throw by 5, and halves the incubation period. The Craft DC is equal to 10 + its original Saving throw DC.

Craft (Chemical)
Brewing: Much like drugs, alcoholic beverages' effects, difficulty of manufacture, and power are based on an abstract Potency rating. The rules for crafting alcohol, however, are far simplified due to the chemical simplicity compared to complex pharmaceuticals. To brew alcohol, a character requires the proper materials, time, and space, as well a Brewing Kit. One Craft check represents the brewing or distillation of one barrel, or 100 litres, of the chosen alcoholic beverage. This takes a number of days equal to its Potency.

Alcoholic beverages have a base Craft DC based on their Potency:
PotencyCraft DC
110
215
320
425
530
635
740
845
950
1055
Additional effects can be crafted into the beverage, such as giving it a Hypnotic or Hallucinogenic quality. These are done as per the Drug Crafting rules in Tomorrow's Evolution, ch.4. Alcoholic beverages, as-is, are considered to be ingested liquids with a 30 minute onset time, a 6 hour duration, the Depressant, Euphoric, and Soporific qualities, the Addiction Tolerance drawback, and the Physically and Psychologically Addictive side-effects.
Up to 5 of the beverage's total Potency may be applied to any one effect. Each effect then possesses a different Potency rating, and thus different severity of effect and difficulty of resistance. When in doubt, the Depressant quality is the default effect of alcoholic beverages.

The effects of the beverage's Potency on the user of the beverage is covered in the drinking section.
Like drugs, alcohol has a final Purchase DC equal to its final Craft DC -10.

Craft (Cooking)
This skill covers food preparation and cooking meals, including baking, frying, searing, broiling, boiling, grilling, and other methods; from the most basic microwavable dinner to the most complex from-scratch meals.
You must have the necessary preparatory space, raw materials such as meat and vegetables, and ample spices as well as time to focus. A successful skill check means that you've prepared or coordinated a meal fit for a human consumption, while a failed check indicates any result from an ordinary meal to a complete culinary disaster and wasting of raw materials. A check is made for a single serving of the meal for a single person, with +2 added to the check per additional serving or person.

Skill UseCraft DC
Microwavable meal5
Basic cooked meal10
Making dough from scratch12
Cooking fresh meat15
Delicious meal (+2 to social interaction skills with those eating)15
Fantastic meal (+4 to social interaction skills)20
This skill can also be used to detect certain diseases or poisons (DC 10 + poison or disease's Fort save DC), to reflavor a meal during or after cooking (DC 15), and to cover up the taste of a poison or disease (DC equal to the poison or disease's Fort save DC).

Craft (Pharmaceutical)
This Craft skill can now be used to manufacture drugs, as per the Drug Crafting rules in Tomorrow's Evolution, ch.4, pp.41.

Craft (Structural)
Fortifications: This use cannot be performed untrained. Characters can make fortifications to aid them in combat, from the simple (yet effective) foxhole, to the bunkers described in the Modern Core Rulebook. Hasty Fortifications can be constructed more quickly. For each five points by which the character’s skill check exceeds the DC, reduce the construction time by one hour. Vehicles in the new vehicles section can reduce many of these times to minutes. Fortifications are also useful to deny an enemy the use of its vehicles in a certain area or from a certain direction, by building Anti-Mobility Constructions. The opposite of anti-mobility are Mobility Constructions, allows you to get where you’re going faster, land aircraft safely, and cross raging rivers. Again the right equipment (such as a Bridgelayer) can reduce construction times substantially.

Craft (textiles)
This skill covers repairing and manufacturing finished textiles, whether they're clothes, blankets, flags, or any other kind of cloth-based item. This includes sewing, knitting, and crocheting, as well as embroidery.
You must have the necessary preparatory space, raw materials such as yarn or existing fabric, and buttons or other accessories as well as time to focus. A successful skill check means that you've created or modified your textile as you desired, while a failed check indicates any result from an ordinary meal to a complete disaster and wasting of raw materials.

Skill UseCraft DC
Repairing a button or a rend in fabric10
Make 1 meter of fabric, embroider existing fabric12
Make a sized article of clothing15
...Blanket, sheet, or quilt15
...Tailored article of clothing18
...Custom fitted clothing set20
Craft (Writing)
Manifesto: A character may write a manifesto to increase his Leadership score, as shown on the table below.
Skill Check Effort AchievedLeadership
Modifier
9 or lowerUninspiring Idealist-1
10-19Parrot+0
20-24Inspirational+1
25-30Revolutionary+2
31 or higherRadical Idealist+3
Written Propaganda: Written propaganda is used to allay fears, or to cement suspicions by those trained in psychological warfare. This propaganda can take the form of a newspaper, leaflets dropped from aircraft, a website, or any other form of the written word.
Propaganda, in any form, allows properly trained characters to improve people’s impressions of their allies, and turn them against their enemies. Use of written propaganda has the same DC table as using Diplomacy or Intimidate to change the attitude of another character, but may be applied to multiple characters simultaneously. Characters without the Psychological Warfare feat take a -4 to this use of the Craft skill.

Intimidate
Interrogation: For hostile interrogations, an Intimidate skill check can allow a character to get information from an enemy. Interrogation is resisted by a level check, opposed by the Interrogation skill check of the character, modified as follows:
ConditionModifier
Each consecutive day a character is interrogated+1 per day
Character is Mentally Fatigued+2
Character is Mentally Exhausted+6
Character is physically fatigued+2
Character is physically exhausted+6
Each 8 points of damage the character has suffered+1

Perform (Oratory)

Spoken Propaganda: Spoken propaganda works just like written propaganda, and may be used to change the attitude of large groups of people. Characters without the Psychological Warfare feat take a -4 to this use of the Perform skill.

Perform (sexual act)

This skill covers sexual acts as a skilled performance. Being a skilled lover requires practice, just like any skill. This new category of the Perform skill encompasses an understanding of a wide array of sexual styles and positions. Some people may specialise in seductive, sensual play while others are much more aggressive and rough. Regardless of the actual methods of lovemaking that you know, you combine all your sexual knowledge and ability into one Perform check. Without this skill, you are not necessarily a bad lover, just untrained in the finer, more subtle and skilled aspects.

ResultCheck DC
Routine performance10
Enjoyable performance15
Great performance. You may gain the attention of attractive or powerful people. You gain a +1 bonus on Diplomacy checks with that person until the next sexual encounter.20
Memorable performance. In time, you may gain the attention of a patron or partner who craves your sexual ability. You gain a +2 bonus on Diplomacy checks with that person until the next sexual encounter.25
Excellent performance. In time, your sexual prowess may become legendary and gains the renown of powerful people. You gain a +4 bonus on Diplomacy checks with that person until the next sexual encounter.30

Spot

Radar Operation
: Even with modern advanced radar systems, the eye of the operator is still key in determining the difference between a large cloud bank and a squadron of incoming fighters. A successful spot check will allow the operator to distinguish natural phenomena from aircraft at a range of several miles. Characters without the Radar Operation feat take a –4 penalty to Spot checks for Radar Operation.

Air Traffic Control: When making spot checks for radar operation you can assist a craft in taking off or landing. The base DC is 15 and grants a +2 circumstance bonus to Pilot skill checks. For every 5 points by which your roll exceeds this DC an additional +1 bonus is granted. This use of the Spot skill may not be used untrained.

Reconnaissance: Knowing where your enemy is, in what numbers, how he is defended, and where he is going are crucial to formation of a plan for attack or defence. Besides providing the information above, a successful reconnaissance skill check will grant the following bonus to Knowledge (tactics) if brought the attention of a friendly force within 24 hours.
CheckBonus
15+2
20+3
25+4

Survival
Signalling: This skill also covers non-electronic methods of communication, such as Semaphore, and can allow a character to perform the Air Traffic Control skill without a radio by using lights, flares, flags, and other improvised methods.

Tumble
Paradrop: Airborne insertions are a powerful military tool for inserting soldiers behind enemy lines for scouting, surprise raids, and special operations. In modern warfare, heavily fortified positions can be bypassed, encircled, and defeated with far less casualties than were taken in past conflicts. This skill allows a character to land precisely where he or she wishes to, and also allows parachuting under less than ideal conditions. This skill also covers preparing equipment to be dropped.
Failing this check means the character lands 100 meters off target for every two points by which his roll missed the DC. Failing a check by more than 5 means the character has landed somewhere dangerous. Failing the check to safely land in dense foliage such as a forest means the character has become fouled in the brush feet above the ground. Getting down usually involves climbing or simply cutting yourself free and falling the remaining distance. Failing the check from a high speed or low altitude insertion results in 1d4 points of damage per 2 points by which the character missed the DC. The character may attempt either a Reflex save (DC 20), or a Tumble check (DC 15) to reduce this damage by half.
Forces on the ground need to roll a Spot check (DC 10 for HAHO jumps, DC 20 for HALO jumps) to detect incoming paratroopers 30 seconds before landing (reduced to 6 seconds for HALO jumps). Paratroopers in the air are extremely vulnerable to enemy fire, being treated as flat-footed both while in the air, and for 1d4 rounds after they land. A successful Tumble check (DC 15) will allow a character to get clear of his riggings in the minimum time (1 round).
A character may make a LALO, or low-altitude, low-opening jump. This is extremely dangerous, being done at very low altitudes wherein the paratroopers release their chutes very soon after jumping. A character making a LALO jump takes 2d6 points of nonlethal damage. However, the enemy is not able to react fast enough to attack them as they deploy onto the ground.
Sample ActionsDC
Land within 30 m of target15
Land within 100 m of target10
Land within 1 km of target5
Paradrop through dense foliage25
HALO+5
LALO+5
Paradrop equipment20
Clear riggings in 1 round15


Last edited by Better Alex on Thu Dec 29, 2016 10:09 pm; edited 18 times in total
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Better Alex



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Join date : 2011-09-30

PostSubject: Re: Homebrew Rulings   Mon Jul 09, 2012 6:50 pm

Environmental Hazards: Temperature
Temperature falls into one of twelve bands, as detailed in this table:
Temperature (C) Classification
91º and higherBurning Heat
76º to 90ºUnearthly Heat
61º to 75ºExtreme Heat
46º to 60ºSevere Heat
31º to 45ºHot
16º to 30ºWarm
15º to 1ºModerate
0º to -15º Cold
-16º to -30º Severe Cold
-31º to -45ºExtreme Cold
-46º to -60ºUnearthly Cold
-61º to -75ºDeathly Cold
Protective gear against temperature is resistant completely to one or more levels of temperature. Temperatures to which a protective gear is only partially effective greatly widen the time between required Fortitude saves: 10-minute intervals become 1-hour intervals. They provide no protection in temperatures to which they are ineffective. Regardless of protective level, they always provide their stated bonus to Fortitude saves against temperature effects, if any.

Characters in moderate to warm bands are generally unaffected by those temperatures. This is the "Normal" temperature range.

Unprotected characters exposed to temperatures one step beyond the normal range must make a Fortitude save every hour (DC 15 + 1 per previous check), or take 1d6 points of nonlethal damage per failed save. Characters whose protection against temperature is level 1 or higher are safe in this temperature.

Unprotected characters exposed to severe temperature must make a Fortitude save every 10 minutes (DC 15 + 1 per previous check), or take 1d6 points of nonlethal damage per failed save. Characters whose protection against temperature is level 2 or higher are safe in this temperature. Level 1 protection is only partially effective.

Unprotected characters exposed to extreme temperature takes 1d4 lethal damage every 10 minutes, as well as having to make a Fortitude save as per severe temperature. Characters whose protection against temperature is level 3 or higher are safe in this temperature. Level 2 protection is only partially effective. Level 1 protection is ineffective.

Unprotected characters exposed to unearthly temperature take 1d6 lethal damage every 10 minutes, as well as having to make a Fortitude save as per severe temperature. Characters whose protection against temperature is level 4 or higher are safe in this temperature. Level 2, and 3 protection is only partially effective. Level 1 protection is ineffective.

Unprotected characters exposed to deathly cold or burning hot temperatures take 1d10 points of either cold or fire damage every 10 minutes, as the blistering cold or scalding heat sear their flesh. Characters exposed to deathly cold are immediately frostbitten, and characters exposed to burning heat are immediately burned. Only characters whose protection against temperature is level 5 are safe in this temperature. Level 4 protection is only partially effective. Anything else is ineffective.

In either case, a character who takes nonlethal damage from the effects of temperature suffers from fatigue. For cold this is due hypothermia, and for heat this is due to heatstroke. A character who falls unconscious while under the effects of heatstroke or hypothermia takes 1d4 lethal damage instead of nonlethal for the intervals at which they would save against nonlethal damage.

At certain specific temperatures, special effects occur.
At -273º C, no level of protection is effective against snap-freezing. At this temperature, an environment is very close to absolute zero. If a character without a space suit is exposed to an environment or, more likely, an object at this temperature, he or she has most likely come into physical contact with a Bose-Einstein condensate and experiences snap-freezing effects, taking their hit dice in Cold damage.
At 100º C, water boils. Unsealed containers of water will witness their contents steaming out, and characters exposed to boiling water are burned by the scalding liquid.
At around 210º and 280º C, petrochemicals such as classic jet fuel and petroleum, as well as synthetic ethanol automatically ignite. This may cause a runaway combustion reaction, causing the containers of such things to explode.
At around 1100º C, human skin ignites into flame, as does wood. Characters so exposed light on fire and immediately take their hit dice in Fire damage.


Conditions and Injuries

Arm or Leg Loss: If a character's arm or leg is damaged through an injury that is not a severing attack, the character may be at risk of losing the limb. The character must make a Fortitude saving throw (DC 20) to stave off limb loss. If the character fails the saving throw, he or she suffers from the Useless Arm or Leg condition until the limb can be amputated. If the character succeeds at the saving throw, the limb is considered as if broken until it can be set and healed by a character using a medical kit or surgical kit with a Treat Injury check (DC 20).

Blinded
As the standard condition. This may be alleviated by a Treat Injury check (DC 20) using a medical or surgical kit. If the Treat Injury check is failed then the character is blinded for 1d6 months. If the check is failed by 5 or more, the damage is permanent. If the check is successful, the blinded suffers a penalty to Spot skill checks equal to –1 per 4 points of damage inflicted by the injury, which recovers at the rate of one point per day.

Broken Arm: This condition persists for 1d6 weeks, minus one week per point of the character’s Constitution modifier, minimum 1 week. If a character has a broken arm that is not set, the character may use that arm normally, but suffers a –2 to all actions performed with that arm, and must make a DC 15 Fortitude Save or suffer 1d6 points of damage when using that arm. A character with a first aid kit may make a Treat Injury check (DC 20) to set a broken arm. This reduces the penalty to –1, and the character suffers no damage from using the limb. Once an arm is set, only the –1 penalty applies until the condition is healed.

Broken Leg: This condition persists for 1d6 months, minus one month per point of the character’s Constitution modifier, minimum 2 months. If a character has a broken leg that is not set, the character may stand on that leg, but reduces base speed by 1 square, suffers a –4 penalty to Defence, and must make a Fortitude Save (DC 15) or suffer 1d6 points of damage each round the character stands on that leg. A character standing on one leg is flat-footed, but does not suffer damage. A character standing on one foot or on a broken leg that is hit in combat must make a Balance check (DC 15 if the character is placing weight on the broken leg, or DC 20 if the character is standing on one leg) or be knocked prone. A character with a first aid kit may make a Treat Injury check (DC 20) to set a broken leg. Once a leg is set, a character suffers a –2 penalty to Defence and suffers the speed penalty for as long as the condition persists.

Burned:
Due to your burn, your skin is raw and sensitive to exposure. You take -1 to all saving throws due to skin sensitivity. Being burned occurs after having been lit on fire or taking fire damage equal to one's massive damage threshold, though not necessarily after taking any and all fire damage. Being burned can only be cured with application of a burn cream, which may be done as part of a Treat Injury check to heal the fire damage, or during surgery.

Coma: You drop to 0 HP immediately and are unconscious. If a Treat Injury (DC 25) check is successful, you will wake in 1d6 weeks. If the check is failed it may be retried in 6 weeks, but the DC is increased by 1. This check may be tried every 6 weeks but the DC continues to rise and eventually there is no hope of recovery.

Concussion: This condition persists for 2d6 days, after which it will heal naturally. A character with a concussion will often appear perfectly fine, but will occasionally suffer dizziness, see spots, and in rare cases may even believe he is somewhere else, or become extremely confused. A character with this condition can only use half his ranks in any skill. A character who succeeds at a DC 15 Will save may make a skill check with his full number of skill ranks, but the character must make this save again each time he makes a skill check as long as this condition persists. A character with a first aid kit may make a Treat Injury check (DC 20) to cure a Concussion.

Deafened: As the standard condition.This may be alleviated by a Treat Injury check (DC 20) using a medical or surgical kit. If the Treat Injury check is failed then the character is deaf for 1d6 months. If the check is failed by 5 or more, the character is permanently deaf. If the check is successful, the deafened character suffers a penalty to Listen skill checks equal to –1 per 4 points of damage inflicted by the injury, which recovers at the rate of one point per day.

Frostbite: If a character suffers nonlethal damage from the effects of cold temperature, he or she becomes frostbitten. A character with frostbite is considered to be fatigued until he or she is treated. If a character remains untreated for 12 hours, he or she must make a Fortitude save against injury, DC = damage dealt, with the location of the frostbite determining the sort of injury. This represents the frostbite setting in and doing severe damage to a limb, skin, or other part of the body. A character with a first aid kit may make a Treat Injury check (DC 15) to cure frostbite.

Internally Bleeding: If a character is internally bleeding, he or she takes 1 Con damage per hour until the bleeding is staunched with a successful Treat Injury check (DC 20) by a character using a medical kit or surgical kit.

Severed Hand or Foot: If a hand is severed, the character suffers a –4 penalty to all Climb skill checks as well as all Grapple checks. It precludes the use of any Two-Weapon fighting feats the character may possess or the ability to use two-handed weapons. If the character’s primary hand is severed, then the character will also suffer off-hand penalties for one year with their remaining hand. His or her maximum hit points are reduced by 5%.
If a foot is severed, movement speed is reduced to two squares, precludes the use of the Jump skill and imposes a –4 penalty on all Tumble and Balance skill checks. The character also halves his or her Dexterity bonus to Defence, rounding down. His or her maximum hit points are reduced by 5%.

Severed Arm or Leg: If an arm is severed, the character suffers a –6 penalty to all Climb skill checks as well as all Grapple checks. It precludes the use of any Two-Weapon fighting feats the character may possess or the ability to use two-handed weapons. If the character’s primary hand is injured, then the character will also suffer off-hand penalties for one year. His or her maximum hit points are reduced by 10%.
If a leg is severed, movement speed is reduced to two squares, precludes the use of the Jump skill and imposes a –4 penalty on all Tumble and Balance skill checks. The character also receives no Dexterity bonus to Defence. His or her maximum hit points are reduced by 20%

Useless Arm or Leg: If an arm is rendered useless, but is not severed from the body, the character suffers the same penalties as a severed arm except that the character's maximum hit points are unaffected. The same relationship exists vis-à-vis a useless/severed leg.


New Diseases and Disease Rules
Diseases now have additional factors that affect their incubation period and fortitude saving throw DC.
In a lightly contaminated environment, the incubation period is reduced by 1 hour and the Fort save DC is increased by 1.
In a moderately contaminated environment, the incubation period is reduced by 2 hours and the Fort save DC is increased by 2.
In a heavily contaminated environment, the incubation period is reduced by 3 hours and the Fort save DC is increased by 3.
In a somewhat sterile environment, the incubation period is extended by 1 hour and the Fort save DC is reduced by 1.

Sepsis
If a character takes damage from a slashing, piercing, or ballistic weapon or takes bleed damage, he or she must clean the wound with a DC 5 Treat Injury check, provided there are materials nearby that can be used to clean the wound sufficiently, at a rate of one check per hour. If he or she fails to clean the wound or wounds for more than one hour, he or she becomes at-risk for infection. An infection sets in that is dangerously septic--an infection of the blood.
Sepsis functions as a contact disease with an incubation period of 6 hours and a Fortitude saving throw DC of 17 with an initial damage of 1d4 Constitution damage.
Each day the character fails the secondary fortitude save, he or she takes 1 Constitution and 1 Strength damage. He or she suffers from the Septic Shock condition for the duration of his or her infection.

The Treat Injury DC to cure a septic infection is equal to 15 + 1 per day of infection.
If a limb injury is the point of infection, there is a 1 in 20 chance that it must be amputated. This chance expands by 1 for each day of untreated infection.

Pregnancy
Pregnancy isn't a "disease" so much as a complication, but it is treated as a contact disease with a DC 25 Fortitude saving throw--but if the save is made, the fertilization is effective. When opposite-sexed persons have sexual conduct, and when a woman is artificially fertilised, the female must make such a saving throw. Pregnancy only occurs in females. A pregnant female cannot cause another female to become pregnant from contact.

Pregnancy runs its course in 8-10 months in humans.

Pregnancy manifests itself as physical weakness (1d2 Strength damage per month) ravenous hunger (a character must eat twice as much in order to maintain nutrition) and aversion to certain foods (a character must make a DC 15 fortitude save or be Nauseated), fatigue, increased weight (add extra weight as the DM sees fit), bloating (taking a -5 penalty on Disguise checks), mood swings (taking a -2 penalty on Diplomacy checks), and pain in the lower back causing a -2 penalty on attack rolls. In the later months of pregnancy, contractions also occur, causing a character to wake up exhausted in the mornings, and take a -2 penalty on attack rolls from sheer discomfort in addition to the normal rules for exhaustion.

Finally, at the end of pregnancy's course, a character needs to find a place to rest constantly, as the baby will be well on its way. During birth, the character must succeed on a DC 10 Fortitude save every round or take 1d2 points of lethal damage. If the damage reduces her to negative hit points, she dies, and the baby must make a DC 5 fortitude save or die with its mother. Birth takes nine rounds to complete. If a character survives the birth, she must make a DC 15 fortitude save or fall unconscious for 1d4 hours.


New Causes of Existing Conditions
If a character is at half of his or her maximum hit points, he or she is Fatigued.
If a character is at one-quarter of his or her maximum hit points, he or she is Exhausted.
In both cases, a Fortitude saving throw of 15 can negate the effect. The Endurance feat also negates these effects.

Drinking
A character may imbibe alcohol, which provokes Fortitude saving throws against inebriation and stupefaction: a Fortitude save with a DC equal to 15 + the effect's Potency for Depressant effects; and a Fortitude save with a DC equal to 15 + 5 per effect's Potency above 1 for the Soporific effects.
A successful save reduces these penalties by half. Regardless of if these saves are failed or successful, alcoholic beverages always impart a bonus equal to its Euphoric effect Potency to Will saving throws.
These effects last for 6 hours.

A character may drink a number of alcoholic beverages equal to his or her Constitution modifier. These beverages' Potency ratings may not exceed his or her Constitution modifier. If either too many drinks are imbibed or too strong a drink is imbibed, he or she is immediately Sickened for 1d4 hours. If a character continues to drink while Sickened, he or she becomes Nauseated for 1d4 hours.

If a character falls prey to the drink's Soporific effects, the next morning he or she must make a Fortitude saving throw with a DC equal to 10 + the number of drinks imbibed, to avoid becoming hungover. He or she is Dazzled for 24 hours, -1 hour per point of Constitution score), due to headaches and over-sensitivity to light and sound.

Alcohol is physically and psychologically addictive. After a week of consistent drinking, the character provokes a Fortitude saving throw against physical addition and a Will saving throw against psychological addiction, both with a DC equal to 10 + the drink's total Potency.
Those who attain an addiction to alcohol become tolerant to its effects, reducing its penalties and bonuses by half whenever an addicted character fails a Fortitude save against its effects, or to none at all whenever they succeed at the Fortitude save.


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PostSubject: Re: Homebrew Rulings   Mon Jul 09, 2012 7:34 pm

Wealth Loss
Object or Service Purchase DCWealth Bonus Decrease
Current Wealth Bonus or lessno change
1-10 higher than current Wealth Bonus-1 point
11-15 higher than current Wealth Bonus-1d6 points
16 or more points higher than current Wealth Bonus-2d6 points

A.I. Linking
If a character is using a suit of powered armour, he or she can install an AI core into the suit with a DC 15 Craft (electronics) check. If a character possesses the Neural Link cybernetic, he or she may do this also, but the AI core is installed directly to their neural connector via a quantum memory chip. The AI then is neurally integrated with the character, either via the suit's computer link systems or via the direct neural chip. In either case, the effects are the same:
The character so integrated receives a +2 bonus to all ranged and melee attacks, a +2 bonus to Defence, and a +1 square increase to his or her land speed. He or she uses all skill checks as if he or she were being helped by another character with the Aid Another action. He or she may use the AI's skill modifier for any Intelligence-based skills. The AI's skill modifier is used for suit Computer Use checks in place of the suit's equipment bonus.
A character who has been integrated with the AI for a long, continuous period of time (1 year or more) becomes so attached to the AI that they are like an extension of him or herself, gaining a +2 bonus to all saving throws and may use the AI's skill modifier for any Wisdom-based skills. If, for whatever reason, the AI is abruptly removed from the neural link or attachment, the character takes 1 negative level per ten years of having been integrated, and must make a DC 20 Will save or suffer a complete, catastrophic psychotic break.


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PostSubject: Re: Homebrew Rulings   Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:19 am

Combat Changes

AOO's
Due to the fact that combat is oriented more towards firearms, one can make an Attack of Opportunity with a ranged weapon that one is proficient with, provided the opponent crosses into one's threatened area.

Autofire
Autofire now has a Reflex DC equal to the attack roll of the attacker. For each increment of 5 that a character fails his or her Reflex save by, he or she takes an additional dice of damage up to the number of shots fired.

Burst Fire
The feat Burst Fire no longer simply allows a character to do the burst fire attack. Instead, it renders it such that a character with that feat suffers no penalty to their attack roll when making a burst fire attack. Anyone can do burst fire with a firearm that is capable of such.

Combat Tactics
The Knowledge (tactics) skill provides a character with an advantage over his or her opponents in combat. Once per combat, as a move action, one character on each side of a battle may roll an opposed tactics skill check. The winner of this contest gains a bonus to either attack, defence, or initiative equal to their Intelligence modifier. If a bonus to initiative is selected, the character may either choose to improve his or her initiative by his or her Intelligence modifier, or roll again with an additional bonus equal to his Intelligence modifier. If the character chooses to roll again, he must take the new result even if it is worse than his previous initiative. This bonus applies only to the character using the skill, unless the character has the Tactician feat, in which case he or she may apply these bonuses to his team-mates as well.

Covering Fire
One of the key advantages of a gun is to make the other guy duck. One character armed with a weapon capable of firing on automatic may grant allied characters a Defence bonus of +2, or his Dexterity modifier, whichever is higher.

Crossfire
Modern weaponry can be quite powerful, even too powerful. Projectiles and beams can blow through people, ricochet off surfaces, or just plain miss horribly and strike an unintended target. Ordinary characters don't have the training and skill to avoid this, and are beholden to crossfire. When engaged in combat, every character within one range increment of a firefight (based on the shortest range of any weapon being used) has to make a Reflex save every round to avoid taking 1d12 Crossfire damage from ricochet, debris, shrapnel, and missed rounds. The DC is equal to 5 per side involved in combat, adding +1 to the save DC for each missed attack that round.

Energy Shields
Energy shields are devices integrated to armour, clothing, or objects via a special modification, the Shield Frame. The shield has a Shield Rating, which acts as a deflection bonus to Defence for persons, and a bonus to Hardness for objects.
An energy shield can be activated or deactivated when integrated into a suit of armour, a belt with a power pack, a vehicle, or in the user's skin. Activation or deactivation takes a full round to charge or discharge.

An energy shield may be used as an impromptu weapon. For a character to do so, he or she must make bodily contact with an enemy such that his or her full presence is brought to bear, such as the case of a bull rush, a grapple, being grappled, pinning an opponent, or being pinned. When such a case is met, the character may overload the shield in a burst, dealing damage proportional to the Shield Rating. For a character who is pinned or being pinned, and overloads his or her shield, the damage is multiplied by x2.
For an object to do so, the object must make full contact with another object or a character, such as when falling or (if a vehicle) ramming. When such a case is met, whomever is controlling the energy shield may overload the shield in a burst, again dealing damage proportional to the Shield Rating.

Indirect Fire
Weapons such as mortar and artillery have many unique advantages, but require a special set of skills to use correctly. Indirect Fire ignores all cover bonuses less than Full or 90% cover. Since the rounds come from above, cover such as sandbags, foxholes, walls etc. provide no protection. Indirect Fire attacks also suffer no range penalties, allowing these weapons to be used at extremely great distance with little loss in accuracy.

Indirect Fire attacks start at -10 to hit. Every round that is fired decreases this penalty by one, until after 10 attacks, the operator is able to attack at his full Base Attack Bonus. Many factors can help the operator negate this penalty more quickly:
Modern artillery pieces, even those as small as the mortar, have very sophisticated sites and range finders, granting a +2 bonus to hit. Use of an artillery sight requires an attack action. Vehicle-mounted artillery pieces and stationary artillery batteries are usually linked to sophisticated computer targeting systems, further reducing the penalties (as covered in the Equipment section).
Scouting can greatly increase artillery accuracy. Either by land (forward observation), air, or satellite (requiring a recent satellite pass), on a successful Spot check (DC 20) the character receives a +2 to hit. Generally, the ubiquity of information technology on the modern battlefield means that, so long as a unit has a proper satellite connection, the bonus from scouting is assumed to be in effect.

Posture
Kneeling or going prone have certain effects on you in combat, as follows:
Kneeling:
+1 to Attack Rolls on Ranged Attacks.
+2 to Defense vs Ranged Attacks.
+1 Circumstance Bonus to Hide.
-2 to Reflex saves.
-2 to Defense vs Melee Attacks.
-2 to Attack Rolls on Melee Attacks.
Movement speed halved.

Prone:
+2 to Attack Rolls on Ranged Attacks.
+4 to Defense vs Ranged Attacks.
+2 Circumstance Bonus to Hide.
Explosive/area of effect damage dealt to character reduced by 50% if not in epicenter/directly hit.
-4 to Reflex saves.
-4 to Defence vs Melee Attacks.
-4 to Attack Rolls on Melee Attacks.
Character may only move by crawling.

Severing
As a special attack action, a character with a bladed weapon may attempt to sever the limb of an opponent. The attack roll provokes an attack of opportunity. The attacker must declare that they are using this special attack and which limb they are aiming for, which takes penalties based on the Hit Location table. The opponent receives a +2 bonus to defence, regardless of other circumstances. If the attack is successful, the opponent gains the Limb Loss condition and must make the requisite saving throws to avoid loss of limb.
Special: Explosives that damage a character within one square of the blast-centre automatically provoke a severing attack upon the character. As there is nothing to counterattack, it provokes no attack of opportunity. In this case, the Fortitude save DC is equal to the Reflex save to halve damage. This kind of attack is provoked even if the character succeeds at said Reflex save, unless he or she has the Evasion ability and thus takes no damage from the explosion. A roll of 1d6 is done by the character who placed, threw, launched, or otherwise detonated the explosive to determine which limb is targeted by the explosion: 1 for hand, 2 for foot, 3 for arm, 4 for left leg, 5 for right leg, and 6 for head.

Shotguns
At half the shotgun's first range increment, the critical threat range is 19-20. At one-quarter the shotgun's first range increment, the critical threat range is 18-20. Beyond that, the critical threat range is as normal.

Strangulation
Strangling is different from suffocation because it not only suffocates the target but cuts off blood flow to the brain. Therefore, it is faster in dispatching an opponent than suffocation or typical grappling, but can only be performed against characters one size larger, the same size, or one size smaller than the attacker that have definable necks and heads in which reside a brain that requires breathing to live. The front half of the neck must also be clear of armor designed specifically to protect the neck from strangulation, such as a bevor. Mail and most kinds of combat armor do not provide this protection, though a gorget gives the victim +4 against the touch attack to initiate strangulation.
To strangle an opponent, a character must successfully grapple and then pin the opponent. If the attacker has Improved Grapple, they need not pin before initiating strangulation. Once the opponent is at their mercy, they must make a touch attack to begin strangling which provokes an attack of opportunity from surrounding enemies, but not the victim. If the attacker has the Chokehold feat, they may initiate a strangulation attack without provoking an attack of opportunity. If failed, strangling does not begin, but the pin is not lost. The touch attack can be made again on the attacker’s next turn to initiate strangulation.
On the first round of a successfully initiated strangulation, the victim makes a Fortitude save against the attacker’s Strength check. If succeeded, the victim fends off unconsciousness. If the Fortitude save fails, the victim goes unconscious (0 HP from nonlethal damage). In the round following unconsciousness, the victim drops to -1 hit points and is dying. In the third round, he or she dies from impaired bloodflow to the brain. No saves are made after unconsciousness. The attacker can stop strangling at any time, and a victim rendered unconscious or dying by the strangulation is automatically left stable.
The victim will not go unconscious until its Fortitude Save fails to a Strength check, and another Strength check is made each round the attacker continues to strangle. Every successful Fortitude save staves off unconsciousness, but comes with 1d4 nonlethal damage inherent to being strangled (lethal if it is with a garotte).
If the attacker fails to send the victim unconscious, the victim can try to throw off the attacker with an opposed grapple check (which ends the pin and leaves the two normally grappling). The attacker takes -2 to grapple checks because he is using both hands to strangle.
The victim can also use an Escape Artist check opposed by the opponent’s Strength check to try and pry off his hands instead of an oppose grapple check as noted above, placing them into a normal pin.
A conscious character being strangled cannot speak. It can, however, flail and kick its feet loudly.
Strangling is a full-round action after the initial grappling turn.

Suppressing Fire: As a full-round action, a character whose firearm has at least 10 shots remaining may expend 10 shots to target an unoccupied square. Until their next turn, that character is treated as threatening the square in question with that firearm and can make attacks of opportunity as normal.


Tumbling
As per Irving's ruling on his campaign:
"The DC to Tumble through an opponent's threatened range is 10 + opponent's Base Attack Bonus (+2 per additional opponent) and the DC to Tumble through an opponent's space is 20 + opponent's Base Attack Bonus (+2 per additional opponent)".

Weapon Finesse
The feat Weapon Finesse now allows a character to use their Dexterity modifier for melee attacks with any light weapon, not just one specific, chosen weapon.

Weapon Focus
A character can change the weapon associated with these feats by intensively training for at least 40 hours with a new weapon to benefit from them. Each of these feats can only benefit one weapon at a time, and the benefits applied to the old weapon are permanently lost until regained in this way.


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PostSubject: Re: Homebrew Rulings   Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:52 am

Sanity
Sanity and Insanity are concepts often explored in fiction, and they will be dealt with here via the sanity mechanic, borrowed from the d20 SRD and the Blood and Guts Modern add-on.
Mental conditions are induced through stress, usually engaging in long firefights or seeing a friend die, or seeing terrible things.

Once one's Wisdom score reaches zero, one has become hopelessly, incurably insane. Sanity loss occurs at GM's discretion, sometimes with a Will saving throw to negate. Generally, however:

Whenever a character sees a friend die, engages in a firefight lasting more than 10 rounds, witnesses an atrocity, suffers Wisdom damage or drain equal to or greater than his or her Wisdom modifier, or experiences something he or she considers terrifying, he or she has experienced enough of a shock to necessitate a DC 15 Will saving throw. If the save fails, the character suffers from Mental Fatigue, possessing the same effects of Fatigue, but is mental in nature and may be cured by complete bedrest. Alternatively, Mental Fatigue can be "snapped out" of with another character performing a DC 15 Knowledge (Behavioural Sciences) check after 1d4 hours of treatment.

Whenever a character engages in actions or has experiences that would normally trigger Mental Fatigue while experiencing Mental Fatigue, he or she has experienced enough of a shock that he or she must make a DC 18 Will saving throw. If the save fails, the character suffers from Mental Exhaustion. Mental Exhaustion functions just like normal Exhaustion, but is mental in nature, and may be cured either by complete bedrest or "snapped out of" by a DC 18 Knowledge (Behavioural Sciences) check after 1d4 hours of treatment, after which the character is suffering from Mental Fatigue until cured.

Whenever a character engages in actions or has experiences that would normally trigger Mental Fatigue while experiencing Mental Exhaustion, he or she must make a Will saving throw (DC 18) or enter a state of Mental Paralysis. A character suffering from mental paralysis has an effective Strength and Dexterity of 0, and is helpless for 1d6 rounds, and thereafter suffers a Mental Breakdown. If the character succeeds their Will saving throw, they remain mentally exhausted.
When a character fails a saving throw against Mental Paralysis, he or she suffers a Mental Breakdown. Typically, the breakdown results in Post-Traumatic Stress. Even after the mental paralysis is resolved, the character suffers The character suffers from nightmares (which render the character fatigued the next day) unless they pass a DC 15 Will save during the night, experiences a "numb" feeling (takes a -4 penalty to all skill checks), and has a 1 in 20 chance of being fatigued any given day (roll 1d20, natural 1 results in fatigue). If he or she undergoes extreme stress again, he or she must make a DC 20 Will save or become mentally exhausted.
Mental scarring of this type does not just "go away" but must be cured through therapy provided by a medical professional with a long-term application of the DC 20 Knowledge (Behavioural Science) skill over a course of 2d12 months (one check per week).

Whenever a character takes Wisdom damage or drain and has his or her Wisdom score reduced to zero, he or she goes indefinitely insane with no saving throw to negate, and must roll randomly for a mental disorder from the indefinite insanity table. These conditions must be cured through therapy provided by a medical professional with the Therapist feat and a long-term application of the Knowledge (behavioural science) skill over a course of 2d12 months, at a DC equal to 10 + 1/2 the disorder's dice roll each time.
Characters suffering from a result ranging from 96-100% cannot be cured in any manner and must be permanently institutionalised.

Indefinite Insanity is represented by full-scale psychological disorders, and is determined via a percentile dice roll in accordance with the following table:
d% rollEffect
01-10Mild Anxiety disorders (Generalised Anxiety Disorder, Phobias)
11-20Minor Mood disorder (chronic dysthymia, hypomania)
21-30Impulse Control disorders (hyperactive, obsessive-compulsive, kleptomania)
31-40Sleep disorders (night terrors, sleepwalking, insomnia)
41-50Somatoform disorders (hypochondria, eating disorders, substance abuse)
51-60Major Anxiety disorders (extreme phobia, PTSD, panic disorders)
61-70Dissociative disorders (amnesia, fugue, multiple personality)
71-80Personality disorders (antisocial, narcissistic, borderline)
81-90Major Mood disorders (clinical depression, bipolar disorder, mania)
91-95Schizophrenia spectrum disorders
96-100Catastrophic mental disorders (PMD, catastrophic schizophrenia, complete psychotic breaks)
Note: As part of character creation, Robots and Androids roll a percentile dice in relation to the Indefinite Insanity table. Similarly, if a character is given the Back from the Grave feat, he or she rolls from the Indefinite Insanity table.


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PostSubject: Re: Homebrew Rulings   Tue Oct 16, 2012 5:13 pm

Injuries are sustained in combat whenever one is forced to save against massive damage or whenever one is the recipient of a critical hit. The fortitude save against injury, made immediately afterwards, is a DC = damage dealt. If one fails this saving throw, an injury is determined at DM discretion based on the hit location, determined by a d20 roll from the table below unless the attacker called a hit location as part of the injuring attack.

Hit Location is an important factor in combat. When a character makes an attack and lands a hit, he or she makes a second d20 roll to indicate the location of the hit. Certain locations modify the damage, and limit the kinds of injuries one can take from a critical hit or from taking Massive Damage. If the hit is a critical hit, certain locations modify the critical multiplier by the indicated amount.
One may make targeted attacks on certain locations, but these typically have a modifier to the attack.

RollLocationDamage modifierCritical modifierAttack modifierPossible injuries
1Headx2+2-8Blinded, Deafened, Concussion, Bleeding 1d4 per round, 1d4 Int or Wis damage, Coma.
2Throatx2+2-8Bleeding 1d4 per round, 1d4 Con damage, Exhausted, Fatigued.
3-9Chestx1+0-21d4 Str or Con damage, Bleeding 1d4 per round, Exhausted, Fatigued, Internally Bleeding.
10-11Abdomenx1+1-41d4 Con damage, Exhausted, Fatigued, Bleeding 1d4 per round, Internally Bleeding.
12Shoulderx1+0-41d4 Str damage, Arm loss, Arm broken, Bleeding 1d4 per round.
13Groin+1-61d4 Con damage, Exhausted, Fatigued, Bleeding 1d4 per round, Internally Bleeding.
14Bicep-1-21d4 Str damage, Arm loss, Arm broken, Bleeding 1d4 per round.
15Forearm-1-21d4 Str damage, 1d4 Dex damage, Arm loss, Arm broken, Bleeding 1d4 per round.
16Hand-1-21d4 Dex damage, Hand loss.
17Thighx1+0-21d4 Str damage, 1d4 Dex damage, Leg loss, Broken leg, -2 Defence, -2 Movement speed.
18Kneex1+1-21d4 Dex damage, Leg loss, Broken leg, -2 Defence, -2 Movement speed.
19Calfx1+0-41d4 Dex damage, Leg loss, Broken leg, -2 Defence, -2 Movement speed.
20Foot-1-2Foot loss, -2 Defence, -2 Movement speed.



Critical Fumble
happens when one rolls a natural one, and confirms the failure. The natural result of the confirmation roll determines the effect. There are sometimes different effects for melee or ranged attacks, and certain fumbles provoke an attack of opportunity.
In addition, if a character rolls a natural 1 on the roll to confirm a critical failure, they must roll again. If this third roll is a natural one, the character automatically kills themselves with their own weapon in a terrible fumble of incompetence.

d20 RollFumble Effect (melee)Fumble Effect (ranged)Attack of Opportunity
1Your injure yourself with your own weapon, mistiming the swing, and leave yourself open to your enemy. You forfeit any remaining action and provoke an attack of opportunity from any opponents that threaten you, as well as accidentally striking yourself for damage.
You mishandle your weapon, sending your aim awry and you shoot yourself. Attempting to recover control of your weapon you forfeit any remaining actions and provoke an attack of opportunity from any opponents that threaten you, as well as accidentally shooting yourself for damage.Yes
2Your opponent effortlessly circles around your attack and pummels you on the back of the head. You are dazed for 1d5 rounds.Somehow you manage to knock your head, hard. You are dazed for 1d5 rounds.No
3With bovine grace you stumble and twist your ankle. You are injured and take a -2 to Defence. Make a DC 20 Dexterity check or fall prone.With bovine grace you stumble and twist your ankle. You are injured and take a -2 to Defence. Make a DC 20 Dexterity check or fall prone.Yes
4You swing wildly at your enemy but your opponent swiftly turns away from your attack. You slip, fall prone and knock your head hard. You are stunned for 2 roundsYou loose your footing. You slip, fall prone and knock your head hard. You are stunned for 2 rounds.No
5Clumsily, you slip and loose your footing. Make a DC 20 Dexterity check or fall prone. You provoke an attack of opportunity from all enemies who threaten you.Clumsily, you slip and loose your footing. Make a DC 20 Dexterity check or fall prone. You provoke an attack of opportunity from all enemies who threaten you.Yes
6You misjudge your offensive and you leave yourself wide open to retaliation.  Creatures who threaten you may take an attack of opportunity against you, treating you as if you are flat-footed, for that attack only.You misjudge your offensive and you leave yourself wide open to retaliation.  Creatures who threaten you may take an attack of opportunity against you, treating you as if you are flat-footed, for that attack only.Yes
7Handling your weapon like a rank amateur you somehow manage to sprain your wrist. With your injured hand you take a -2 circumstance penalty to attacks and manual actions for 1d4+2 rounds.Handling your weapon like a rank amateur, your weapon whips back and catches you in the eye. You take a -2 circumstance penalty to attacks and manual actions for 1d4+2 rounds.No
8You attack fervently but your opponent deftly sidesteps. Your opponent may take a free attempt to trip you, without provoking an attack of opportunity. In addition your opponent gains a +4 to their opposed check.As you position yourself to take your shot you let down your guard. An opponent who threatens you may take a free attempt to trip you, without provoking an attack of opportunity. In addition your opponent gains a +4 to their opposed check.Yes, to trip only
9Your attack is anticipated by your opponent and you are left open. For 1 full round any attacks against you get a circumstance bonus of +2.Your weapon is slightly damaged. Any further attacks with that weapon receive a -1 circumstance penalty for the rest of the combat. The weapon can be repaired with a full-round action, but to do so would provoke an attack of opportunity.No
10You have grit in your eye. Bloody irritating. You are at -1 to hit for 1d4 rounds.You have grit in your eye. Bloody irritating. You are at -1 to hit for 1d4 rounds.No
11Your bungled attack leaves your weapon low and vulnerable. Your opponent may take a free attempt to sunder your weapon, without provoking an attack of opportunity.Your bungled attack leaves your weapon vulnerable. Anyone who threatens you may take a free attempt to sunder your weapon, without provoking an attack of opportunity.Yes, to sunder only
12Your attack is anticipated by your enemy who parries and turns your weapon away with textbook ease. Your opponent may take a free attack of opportunity against you but only with their off-hand.  If this turns out to be an unarmed strike then they may do so without provoking an attack of opportunity from you in turn.Your fumbled shot sends your missile wide. You curse your incompetent attempt and spend a full round regaining your composure. You may take a move action but not an attack action in this time.Yes, if melee
13You misjudge your opponent, who uses your attack against you. You overbalance and become flat-footed.  You forfeit your remaining actions. You provoke an attack of opportunity from all enemies who threaten you.You fumble, juggle and drop your ammunition or weapon. In this spectacle of incompetence you become flat-footed. You forfeit your remaining actions. You provoke an attack of opportunity from all enemies who threaten you.Yes
14Your opponent defends expertly. You forfeit your remaining attacks.As you attempt to bring your weapon to aim, the term ham-fisted oaf springs to mind. You forfeit your remaining attacks.No
15In an embarrassing display of awkwardness you overbalance and loose your composure.  You forfeit your remaining actions and are flat-footed.In an embarrassing display of awkwardness you stumble and loose your composure.  You forfeit your remaining actions and are flat-footed.No
16Your attack is utterly mistimed. Your opponent may take a free attempt to disarm you, without provoking an attack of opportunity.Your attack is utterly mistimed. Your opponent may take a free attempt to disarm you, without provoking an attack of opportunity.Yes, to disarm only
17You swing your weapon and lose your grip. Make a DC 20 Dexterity check to recover your control or drop your weapon. You provoke an attack of opportunity from all enemies who threaten you.You swing your weapon and lose your grip. Make a DC 20 Dexterity check to recover your control or drop your weapon. You provoke an attack of opportunity from all enemies who threaten you.Yes
18You fumble ineptly, loosening your grip on your weapon. Make a DC 15 Dexterity check to recover your control or forfeit your next attack. You provoke an attack of opportunity from all enemies who threaten you.You fumble ineptly, loosening your grip on your weapon. Make a DC 15 Dexterity check to recover your control or forfeit your next attack. You provoke an attack of opportunity from all enemies who threaten you.Yes
19Your opponent’s parry jars your wrist. This gives you a -2 circumstance penalty to attacks and manual actions with your injured hand for 1 full round. This includes weapons that require two hands.Readying your weapon you strain your wrist. This gives you a -2 circumstance penalty to attacks and manual actions with your injured hand for 1 full round. This includes weapons that require two hands.No
20Your attack is wide leaving you open and off-guard. This provokes an attack of opportunity from all creatures that threaten you.You fumble trying to ready your weapon. You leave yourself open and off-guard, provoking an attack of opportunity from all creatures that threaten you.Yes


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PostSubject: Re: Homebrew Rulings   Sat Jan 12, 2013 5:52 am

Purchase and ownership of many kinds of equipment and items is restricted. Different items carry different restrictions, licensing, and fees.
This requires purchase of an owner's license, which takes a set number of days to process. One may make a Knowledge(Business) check, with a DC equal to the purchase DC of the license) in order to speed up the process to 1d6 hours. If all of this is done during character creation, the time is a non-factor.
In the case that one does not desire to purchase a license and obtain certain items legally, one may attempt to go through the black market. Knowledge(Streetwise) checks can find a black marketeer through which one may purchase restricted items, with a DC dependent on the size and reputation of the locale. Objects purchased on the black market are more expensive than those purchased legally, with a significant surcharge to offset the risk of the merchant. Add the black market purchase DC modifier from the table below to the object’s purchase DC. Obtaining an object on the black market takes a number of days equal to the time it would take to obtain the relevant license. The process can be hurried with a Knowledge(Business) check with a DC equal to the modified Purchase DC of the object, cutting out one day, but each day cut out of the process (to a minimum of one day) increases the purchase DC by an additional +1.

Refer to the table below.
Registration RatingLicense Purchase DCBlack Market Purchase DCTime Required
Licensed10+11 day
Restricted15+22 days
Military20+33 days
Illegal25+44 days

Licensed objects are ones in which the owner must obtain a basic license to own or operate the object legally. Generally, the license is not expensive, and obtaining it has few if any additional legal requirements. This includes things such as motor vehicles, professional gear, and some weapons.

Restricted objects are a bit more tightly regulated. Only specially qualified individuals or organizations are technically allowed to own the object. However, some people with sufficient sway and money are able to acquire restricted licenses. Many restricted objects are hazardous chemicals, some weapons, and aircraft and boats.

Military objects are strictly prohibited to most people. The object is sold primarily to legitimate police and military organizations. A military rating means that manufacturers and dealers of that object are generally under tight government scrutiny and are therefore especially wary of selling to private individuals. These licenses, in addition to the expense, are available only to reservist and retired military or active-duty and retired law enforcement personnel. Such things include most firearms, military vehicles, and body armour.

Illegal objects are strictly regulated by government agencies. The object is illegal in all but specific, highly regulated circumstances. And even then, only to highly qualified individuals and organisations. Such things include heavy military weapons, explosives, and toxic chemicals.
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PostSubject: Re: Homebrew Rulings   Fri Sep 06, 2013 2:37 pm

Poison

Poison rules now function as per Pathfinder's rules on the phenomenon. See the General Items thread in the Equipment page for specific poisons.

Broadly, poisons now have their secondary effects take place at different rates, based on the format by which the poison was administered. The effects of a poison are still resisted by a saving throw, and have an onset time before they begin to take effect. For a poison to be cured once it has begun to take effect, one often has to make more than one successful saving throw. This depends, of course, on the specific poison.

Contact: These poisons are delivered the moment a creature touches the poison with its bare skin. Such poisons can be used as injury poisons. Contact poisons usually have an onset time of 1 minute and a frequency of 1 minute.

Ingested: These poisons are delivered when a creature eats or drinks the poison. Ingested poisons usually have an onset time of 10 minutes and a frequency of 1 minute.

Inhaled: These poisons are delivered the moment a creature enters an area containing such poisons and do not usually have an onset time. For most inhaled poisons, 1 dose fills a volume equal to a 10-foot cube. A creature can attempt to hold its breath while inside the area to avoid inhaling the toxin. A creature holding its breath receives a 50% chance of not having to make a Fortitude save each round. See the rules for holding your breath and suffocation. If a creature is holding its breath and fails the constitution check to continue doing so, rather than suffocating it begins to breathe normally again (and is subject to the effects of the inhaled poison if still in the area).

Injury: These poisons are primarily delivered through the attacks of certain creatures and through weapons coated in the toxin. Injury poisons do not usually have an onset time and have a frequency of 1 round.

Multiple Doses of Poison
Unlike other afflictions, multiple doses of the same poison "stack," meaning that successive doses combine to increase the poison's DC and duration.

Making your initial saving throw against a poison means stacking does not occur—the poison did not affect you and any later doses are treated independently. Likewise, if a poison has been cured or run its course (by you either making the saves or outlasting the poison's duration), stacking does not occur. However, if there is still poison active in you when you are attacked with that type of poison again, and you fail your initial save against the new dose, the doses stack. This has two effects, which last until the poisons run their course.

Increased Duration: Increase the duration of the poison by 1/2 the amount listed in its frequency entry.

Increased DC: Increase the poison's Fort save DC by +2.

These increases are cumulative (a third dose adds another 1/2 of the frequency to the duration and +2 to the DC, and so on). When affected by multiple doses of the same poison, you only make one saving throw at this higher DC when required by the frequency, rather than one saving throw against each dose of the poison.

Multiple doses do not alter the Cure condition of the Poison, and meeting that Cure condition ends all doses of the poison.

Applied contact poisons and injury poisons cannot inflict more than one dose of poison per weapon at a time (because the poison on the weapon only lasts for one successful attack before it wears off). Inhaled and ingested poisons can inflict multiple doses at once.

Doses from different poisons do not stack—the effects of each are tracked separately.

One may craft poisons with a Craft (Chemical) check as outlined in that skill. However, due to the new and different effects of these poisons pursuant to the new ruleset, I will denote the Craft DC and the Purchase DC of the materials of each poison in the Equipment section. Typically, the Craft DC is going to be equal to its Fortitude saving throw DC. But, of course, some poisons are more difficult to refine than others.


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PostSubject: Re: Homebrew Rulings   Sun Mar 13, 2016 5:11 am

Unit Combat enters into play when entire groups are engaged in combat, as whole units. In such cases, units will be formed with their own rules and statistics, but based on the same method of contested skill rolls. Each unit has a commander, and a set of base and derived statistics that represent what it capable of in combat.

Battle Rating is an abstract measure of a unit's ability to fight, based on the Challenge Rating, or CR, of its average individual creature, and the size of the unit. Due to the scales at which units operate, an individual's BR is considerably less than its CR, given that an individual opposed by dozens, hundreds, or thousands of others is at an extreme disadvantage.

Unit SizePersonnelBattle Rating
Individual1CR -8
Fireteam3 to 5CR -6
Squad9 to 12CR -4
Platoon30 to 60CR -2
Company125 to 250CR
Battalion400 to 800CR +2
Regiment1,000 to 2,000CR +4
Brigade2,000 to 5,000CR +6
Division8,000 to 15,000CR +8
.
Hit Points are determined by multiplying a unit's BR by the average hit point value of its personnel's average hit dice, rounded up. If a unit is composed primarily of vehicles, such as an Armoured or Aviation unit, always use d10 as the hit dice.

Defence is a static number value of a unit's ability to defend itself from physical attack. It is equal to the unit's BR + 10 + any other bonuses from fortifications, tactics, abilities, and battlefield conditions.

Attack is a measurement of the unit's ability to attack. It is equal to the unit's BR + any other attack bonuses. This attack bonus is added to a d20 roll to determine the unit's attack. If the Attack roll is a natural 20, but that total roll is lower than the enemy army’s Defence, the attacking unit still deals 1 point of bonus damage. If the Attack roll is a natural 1, that unit can’t attempt an Attack in the next round, due to some setback: misheard orders or weapon jams. If the Attack roll is a natural 20, the dice damage is doubled for that attack.
Attacks take two forms: ranged and melee attacks. A ranged attack has a range of 200 meters, unless otherwise indicated or modified. Melee combat is not necessarily hand-to-hand, but is in close enough quarters that the units are right on top of each other. Certain effects modify ranged and melee attacks differently. Units of platoon size or smaller can occupy the same space when engaged in close combat; units larger than platoon size are adjacent but fighting over ability to occupy the defender's space.

Damage is dealt when an attack is successful. The unit type determines the damage that it does.

Morale is an abstraction of a unit's willpower and resolve, starting at +0 for new units. A unit's commander can modify it by adding +1 for every 5 ranks in the Profession skill, as well as adding their Charisma modifier. A unit's morale bonus is added to a d20 roll for a morale check against certain effects or circumstances. If a unit's Morale is reduced to -5 or lower, it disbands or deserts and can no longer be controlled or used.

Speed is a measure of how fast a unit moves in combat, per round. Each round represents one minute of elapsed time, and each square on the battle map represents a 100 x 100 meter area. Usually, units on foot can move at 2 squares per round. Using motor vehicles and tracked personnel carriers can increase this speed. Armoured units can move even faster across even terrain.

Unit Type describe what that unit does and what it is trained for. Unit specialisations confer certain skills and abilities. Their propensity for combat and the weapons they typically carry determine the kind of base damage they do. A unit with listed skills adds its BR as a bonus to checks with the listed skills.
Each unit type has one or more special actions it can do in a round. This action is done in place of a normal attack roll that round, and any bonuses or penalties provided apply until the end of the next round.
Spoiler:
 

Tactics are special actions that a unit can perform in combat. Unit specialisations confer tactical options to a unit, but a unit can also learn tactics through experience in combat. A unit can know a number of bonus tactics equal to half its BR, rounded down. These tactics require a DC 15 Morale check by the unit's commander to activate.
Spoiler:
 

Special Abilities are effects that a unit can utilise to its advantage in battle, without having make a Morale check to activate like a set of Tactics. Some of these are passive abilities, while some are active actions. Some derive from the features of a certain class or feat, if the majority of its personnel have those abilities.
Spoiler:
 

Battlefield Conditions affect the battle in a number of ways, some of which are caused by the environment itself and some of which are man-made impositions on the battlefield.
Spoiler:
 

Commander
A unit's commander increases its effectiveness in battle and can provide special bonuses to. The key statistics for the unit's commander are his or her Charisma modifier, their ranks in the Profession skill, their Leadership score, and the Boons they know.
A Commander is able to add their Charisma modifier to the unit's Morale checks, and add +1 for every 5 ranks they have in Profession.
A unit without a commander loses 1 Morale per week without a leader.

Boons are special abilities that a Commander possesses and can impart on their unit, rather than abilities the unit itself has. A commander's maximum number of boons is 1, plus 1 for every 5 ranks in Profession. A commander gains new boons through victories.
Spoiler:
 

Battle
A battle consists of each side taking turns over the course of a round. In standard battlefield scale, one round represents one minute of elapsed time, and the untis are assumed to move more or less simultaneously. In each round, a unit can activate a Tactic, move up to its speed, and make an attack. Units take their rounds in initiative order, regardless of which side they are on. In the event of a tie, the two units with the same initiative roll a d20 and the one with the highest result acts before the other. Initiative is a static number composed of 10 + the unit's Morale bonus.
When a unit attacks, it rolls 1d20 and adds its Attack modifier and any other relevant modifiers, bonuses, or penalties. The Attack roll is opposed by the opposing unit's Defence. If the attack overcomes the unit's Defence, the unit deals damage based on its unit type, as well as any bonus damage. Any succssful attack deals bonus damage equal to the difference between the attacking unit's Attack roll and the defending unit's Defence value.
Combat continues until a unit is victorious, routed, or defeated:
Victory: A unit is victorious if all opposing units are defeated or routed. The unit's Morale increases by +1. The commander of a victorious unit makes a DC 15 Charisma check; if they succeed, they gain a boon. The number of boons they gain cannot exceed the maximum number of boons they know.

Rout: If a unit's hit points are reduced to a number equal to or less than its BR, the unit must make a DC 15 Morale check against fear. If it fails, it must attempt to retreat from the battle. If a unit cannot retreat, it surrenders and is captured. If it does rout, it is subject to an opportunistic attack from all enemy units within range. A unit that successfully routs has its Morale reduced by -1.

Defeat: If a unit's hit points are reduced to 0, it is defeated. A defeated unit might not necessarily be all killed, but its survivors are so demoralised (or likely captured) that the unit no longer exists as a cohesive whole. It disperses and cannot re-engaged in combat.

After a battle, a unit can take time to recuperate. Each day at rest, without engaging in combat, a unit heals a number of hit points equal to its BR. This can be supplemented with assistance from units that specialise in medicine. A unit must also be properly supplied and serviced; after the first week after a battle, a unit loses -1 Morale each day that they are not properly resupplied.

Example
Let's take, for instance, an Army rifle company with 180 soldiers, let's called it Alpha Company or Company A. First we have to determine the unit's statistics. The average soldier in Company A is a CR 5 Fast Hero 2/Strong Hero 2/Soldier 1, with an average hit dice of d8. The unit does not have any modifiers to its BR due to size, so its BR is 5. The average hit-point value of a d8 is 4.5; multiplying by the BR gives us 22.5, rounded up to 23 hp. Company A has a Defence score of 16, i.e. 10 + BR + 1 from Heavy. The unit has an Attack modifier of +6, i.e. their BR + 1 from Heavy. It's an Infantry unit, which deals 1d8 base damage when it attacks, and is proficient with the Craft (structural), Hide, and Spot skills. It has the Dig In and Reconnaissance special actions. Company A has a Morale bonus of +8 due to its BR and the bonuses from its commander. It has a movement speed and engagement range of 2 squares.
Tactics: Because the unit has a BR of 5, divided by 2 and rounded down, Company A knows three bonus tactics. The unit likely would know Mortar Barrage, due to having a dedicated mortal platoon, and let's say Sniper Support.
Special Abilities: Because the majority of its personnel have the Sneak Attack class feature, the unit has the Sneak Attack special ability. It is also well-stocked with improved weapons and armour, giving it the Heavy special ability.
Commander: Alpha Company is commanded by a Captain, a CR 8 officer (Fast Hero 2, Charismatic Hero 2, Field Officer 4) with a Charisma score of 13 (Cha mod +1), 10 ranks in Profession, and a Leadership score of 13 (level + Cha mod + Reputation). The Commander, due to having 10 ranks in Profession, can know up to 3 boons; however, it is a raw unit without victories in battle and thus the commander does not know any.

Alpha Company is going up against an opposing unit, a cadre of about 60 veteran rebel commandos; let's call them the Raiders. The average rebel commando is a CR 8 Fast Hero 4/Commando 4, with an average hit dice of d8. The unit has a -2 modifier to its BR due to being a platoon size, and so has a BR of 6. Its unit hit point value, using the same formula as above, is 27 hp. The Raiders have a Defence score of 16 and an Attack modifier of +6. It is a Special Operations unit, which deals 1d8 base damage, and is proficient with Demolitions, Hide, and Spot skills. It has the Assassinate, Invisible, and Sabotage special actions. The Raiders have a Morale bonus of +11. It has a movement and engagement range of 2 squares.
Tactics: Because the unit has a BR of 6, divided by 2, the unit knows 3 bonus tactics. Due to the unit's guerrilla training, let's say these are Expert Flanking, False Retreat, and Sniper Support.
Special Abilities: Because the majority of its fighters have both the Sneak Attack and Uncanny Dodge class features, the unit has the Sneak Attack and Uncanny Dodge special abilities. It trained to fight in its specific environment, so it also has the Terran Specialisation special ability, let's say Jungle.
Commander: the Raiders are commanded by CR 10 captain (Charismatic Hero 4, Field Officer 6) with a Charisma score of 16 (Cha mod +3), 10 ranks in Profession, and a Leadership score of 18. The commander can know up to 3 boons; due to their experience in leading the Raiders in several victories, they know 3: Bloodied but Unbroken, Hit and Run Tactics, and Sharpshooter.

Alpha Company are Dug In, giving them a +2 bonus to Defence, and the Raiders launch an attack from the cover of terrain; the Raiders have the higher initiative, and so they attack first; they make a Hide check opposed by Company A's Spot check, and let's say that they win the check this time. The battle is in a Jungle area, and twin moons shine in the night sky. The battlefield provides the Dim Light condition, imposing a -1 on both sides' attack rolls.
The Raiders are familiar with the territory (+2), have terrain advantage (+1), have surrounded the enemy using the Expert Flankers tactic (+2), attack from surprise (+2) and gain the benefits of Sneak Attack (+1), and are trained as sharpshooters against fortified opponents (+2), but suffer from poor lighting (-1). Alpha Company takes a penalty to its Defence due to being in difficult terrain (-2), neutralising its Defence bonus from being Dug In. The Raiders have a cumulative bonus of +7 on their first attack, and +4 on every attack thereafter. They attack, rolling a 10 on the dice resulting in 21, which beats Company A's defence score of 16 by 9. The Raiders deal 1d8+9 (for the sake of expedience, let's say the d8 rolls a 4, total damage 4+9) or 13 damage, reducing Company A's hp to 10. The Raiders have made their position known, and so lose the element of surprise, but still retain their advantages due to the terrain and being sharpshooters; they move back one square, but don't withdraw.
Alpha Company then attacks, taking a penalty due to dim light (-1). They keep their defensive position, and use their Mortar Barrage tactic. They strike the area that the Raiders have moved into, rolling a lucky 15 on the dice for their attack resulting in a 20; the Raiders have a bonus to defence due to terrain advantages (+1) and familiarity with the battlefield (+2), so their Defence is actually 19. The attack exceeds their defence by 1, dealing 1 bonus damage along with the 1d8 and 1d4 from doing a mortar attack. Let's say the well-drilled troops of Company A roll very well, dealing maximum damage: 8+4+1, totalling 13 damage. The Raiders go down to 14 hit points. While Alpha Company can't move that round, due to laying down a mortar barrage, they can still make their normal attack and roll for it. They manage to land an extremely lucky natural 20, dealing double on the dice damage and exceeding the enemy Defence by 4. Let's say the d8 rolls a 6, and the d4 rolls a 3; the total is 12+4, or 16 damage. The Raiders take too much hit point damage to survive, and are wiped out; maybe not all of them are killed, but enough of them are that the few survivors surrender or flee in a disunited fashion.

Alpha Company has won the battle. Despite being outnumbered vastly, the Raiders platoon had a great deal of advantages: its knowledge of the terrain and battlefield, its training as sharpshooters and raiders, its greater morale and highly skilled commander, and the element of surprise. It even had a higher Battle Rating than the larger force, due to the higher quality of its individual fighters. But through pluck, luck, better equipment, and a fierce counterattack, Company A managed to defeat its enemy; all of its personnel gain experience points, and its Commander can make a DC 15 Charisma check to learn a boon that could give their unit the edge in the next battle. But, until the unit is resupplied and recovers from the attack, it remains at 10 hit points; its BR is 5, so it will take 3 days of rest for it to fully recover without medical assistance..

But even if it is at full hit points, and isn't attacked again, Company A isn't out of the woods yet. Let's say the unit is stranded, and the jungle it had dug into was actually deep within rebel territory. Alpha Company is in danger of dwindling supplies and a resulting dwindling in Morale; after a week stuck behind enemy lines with no resupply, it starts to run low on food, water, fuel, and other materiel and suffers a reduction in Morale of -1 per day. With a Morale of 8, it will take a around two weeks after that for it to reach rock-bottom (-5 or lower). At that point, starvation and anger overwhelm their loyalty and cohesion. The unit disbands into the jungle, abandoning its equipment, and possibly mutinying against or fragging its commander.
Now, if the commander of Company A did successfully gain a boon after that last victory, they could apply their survival skills to the unit with the Live Off the Land boon. With the commander having a Charisma modifier of +1, the company could survive for another week without resupply before they start taking Morale loss. Perhaps this is enough time for them to be evacuated or support to reach them; alternatively, foraging might give them the time they need to make an anabasis through the jungle, back to the safety of their base.
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PostSubject: Re: Homebrew Rulings   

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